Welcome to Pressure Cooker Convert

About Pressure Cooker Convert
Who would have thought that on a “school night” you would be able to prepare a full, delicious (if I do say so myself) meal quickly, while using less energy?
I am Michael Rushlow, and I hope that with this blog, I can show others the joys of pressure cooking.

About Michael
Michael Rushlow (The Pressure Cooker Convert) is a former punk rock musician, has worked in the advertising industry, and has been blogging for several years on the “joys” of commuting by bicycle in Los Angeles.
A home cook with no formal training, too many episodes of Chopped and the discovery of pressure cookers has led him to start his first food blog.
He found that pressure cooking can drastically reduce cooking times, and many dishes that were before only possible on the weekends can now be prepared on weekdays. Gone are the days of takeout just because it was easier. The pressure cooker not only makes cooking faster, but also uses less energy and creates less heat in the kitchen, which is an important consideration when one resides in Southern California (along with a landlord who swears that air conditioning is not necessary when you live only a couple miles from the ocean).
First being drawn to the pressure cooker by the thought of 20-minute beans, Michael soon realized that there is very little that cannot be prepared in the pressure cooker.

21 thoughts on “Welcome to Pressure Cooker Convert

  1. Brilliant! This one goes into my book of keepers. Instead of cream I used 7 fl oz evaporated milk plus 1 oz rum, then spices I generally use in pumpkin pie (cinnamon, cloves & ginger)

    I have no lovely little ramekins like yours so used what we call “salmon jars” – a canning jar about the size of a tin of salmon. They do quite nicely with canning lids (no rings) just set on top and incidentally four of them just fit the steamer basket of my Fagor Futuro.

    Rouladen next and I expect it will be a keeper too. Please keep up the good work.

  2. I worked at Williams Sonoma for several years and the pressure cooker people were always my favorite. It’s like a club or a cult. Once you “get it” you want to tell others about how fast,moist and simple it is to cook things faster. One of my favorite recipes is one from a free little booklet and it’s beef stew with rosemary, orange peel and tomato paste. Lemon cheese cake is great too if you can find a small 8″ pan to fit inside. Great job on showing the how and why you chose ingredients.

    • Thanks for checking out the site, Bob. I definitely had the feeling I was joining some sort of cult when I first started doing this, so I understand what you mean. But I do think that pressure cooking is gaining some popularity lately, and a lot of people are discovering it can do more than just cook beans quickly. I hope you keep coming back and can find some new recipes to enjoy.

      Thanks,

      Michael

  3. Thank you for the Moroccan Chicken recipe; it was incredible! I couldn’t believe how delicious it was. First of many recipes I used with my new pressure cooker.

    • Thanks Rich. So glad to hear you enjoyed the recipe. Have fun with the new pressure cooker, it can be addictive!

  4. Just bought a Fagor Duo 10qt pressure cooker, first meal was your Picadillo recipe, it was excellent!! and nice amount of spice to it, my wife and I really enjoyed it, I am looking forward to cooking with it. thanks for the great receipe.

    • Hi Gary! It’s nice to hear that you chose one of my recipes to inaugurate your new pressure cooker (and even nicer to hear that your wife and you both enjoyed it)! The 10-quart should be a good size. When I first got my seven-liter Kuhn Rikon I thought it seemed huge, but I often find myself filling it right up to the maximum fill line, and on a couple occasions I had to make soup a little thicker than I had planned because I couldn’t add any more liquid. Enjoy the new pressure cooker!

  5. I just wanted to say thanks for sharing your wonderful recipes. I’ve already printed several to try, and I just started looking. I’m definitely a pressure cooker convert. I started using mine about a month ago and haven’t stopped since.

  6. I read your recipe for the cranberry sauce am intrigued. Question about PIP: I just got a 5qt pressure cooker and want to get a bowl to use inside. My problem is that all of the stainless bowls that I see that fit, i.e. 8-8 1/2 inches wide, are only 4 inches deep and the cooker is much deeper than that. Is there a bowl out there that is that wide but much deeper? I feel that to make a big batch of oatmeal (2C dry) or 1# beans, a 2-qt bowl is probably not big enough. I’d appreciate your thoughts. What’s the point in having a 5 qt cooker if I’m constrained to a 2 qt bowl?

    • Jem,

      Thanks for checking out the site. Sorry I took so long to answer your question, I’ve been on vacation.
      The best bowl that I’ve found to use for PIP are the Rosle stainless steel bowls. This one looks like it might fit in your pressure cooker and is 3.3 quarts, and is 7.9″ x 5″. I know it is expensive, but is the best that I have found.
      The problem with a 5 qt. pressure cooker is that you never have 5 quarts of usable space. You are never supposed to fill your PC more than 2/3 of the way up, and for things that tend to foam, such as beans you should never fill it more than 1/2 way. When I bought my first pressure cooker I planned on getting a 5 quart, but the 7 quart happened to be a little cheaper on Amazon at the time and I have never regretted getting the larger size.
      Also, for beans I have never found the need to use the PIP method, it works fine for me directly in the PC. I think 1 lb of beans should fit OK in a 5 quart pressure cooker if cooked directly in the pot. I will be happy to answer any other questions that you might have.

      Thanks,

      Michael

  7. Wow. Another pressure cooker meal aficionado like myself. I too am middle aged and cook 95% of my meals in my pressure cooker. I discovered it several months ago and have an instant pot. The dishes are delicious, flavorful, varied, simple, and don’t take too much time.

    I just tired your grits and it was delicious. While exercising I had them one. Good stuff.

    Can you add more simple recipes on the different types of beans … kidney beans, white beans, black eye peas, etc. Those can be some inexpensive great dishes. Thanks.

    • Reg, thanks for checking out the site. Now that we finally seem to be getting autumn-like weather off and on (it is currently 85F, but we have had a couple cooler days) I will probably start posting more bean recipes. Though probably not kidney beans as I am not a fan, but I will see what I can come up with for the others.

  8. Hi Michael,

    I was doing a research about pressure cooking when I came across in your website through my Twitter account @BernardBurce

    As I was searching for a new pressure cooking recipe, I noticed that you’ve been sharing lots of recipe. I was impressed by your latest blog post “Albondigas, It’s Spanish For Meatballs!”

    I found your website as a great resources for all those are new in pressure cooking PLUS your pressure cooking experience is far different from what I’ve read and it seems that you discovered something worth sharing here.

    Recently, I created a post about pressure cooking titled “5 Surprising Pressure Cooker Tips That Every Cook Should Know” here:

    http://aboutthechef.com/pressure-cooking/pressure-cooker-tips/

    Because you’re an expert user of pressure cooker, I’d like to ask a small favor if you could leave some expert insights or comments that can add value to the readers as well.

    I will appreciates any expert thoughts that you’ll share to the article.

    Either way, keep up the awesome work here.

  9. Hi Michael,

    I stumbled on your blog over the weekend. I just made your Brown Stew Chicken and it is AMAZING!! I lived in the Caribbean for six years and I have to say your recipe has authentic island flavors. I enjoyed this recipe and look forward to trying others.

    • Thanks! It’s always great to hear positive comments from someone who is familiar with the real thing! I hope you find some other recipes on the blog that you enjoy.

  10. Hi, quick question, I am trying to decide between a Fissler and a Kuhn Rikon 8 or 10 quart. I have a family of 6 with 4 teenage boys who eat more than I any one person should. I am inclined to go with the bigger 10 quart. And I just can’t decide between the Fissler and Kuhn Rikon. No stores carry it locally so I can’t see it.

    • Hi! It’s nice to hear some people are still buying stove top pressure cookers. Everyone seems to be jumping on the electric bandwagon lately. Both the Fissler and Kuhn Rikon are great cookers. I might lean a bit towards the Kuhn Rikon. The KR seems easier to find parts for, and the Fissler that I have is just a little more high maintenance. The handles seem to work themselves loose sometimes with a lot of use. They are very easy to tighten but I don’t seem to have that issue with the KR.
      I was looking online at the Kuhn Rikons and I only saw an 8 qt. and 12 qt. I would go with at least a 10 qt., or even the 12. I have a 7 qt., and I sometimes wish I had an 8 qt. just cooking for my wife and me. One thing to keep in mind is that you shouldn’t fill the pot more than 2/3 full, and in the case of items that foam a lot such as beans or pasta, you shouldn’t fill it more than 1/2 full. So with a 10 qt. you only have around 5-7 quarts of usable space. Filling it more can clog valves and cause safety issues.
      I hope this helps, and let me know if you have any other questions.

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