Pressure Cooker Steak and Stout Pie

We Don’t Need No Stinkin’ Corned Beef and Cabbage

Steak & Stout Pie

Corned beef and cabbage? Bah, humbug! Wait, I think that saying is for a different holiday, Is Saint Patrick’s Day even a holiday? I don’t get a day off for it. Of course, many people call in sick the day after it.

If you tell someone from Ireland that you are making corned beef and cabbage because it is Saint Patrick’s day, their reaction is likely to be, “Um, huh?”

I’m led to believe that Steak and Stout pie is something you might actually be able to find in Ireland, at least in the pubs. And if I ever visited Ireland, most of my time would most likely be spent in pubs, so I would probably come across this quite often.

In this in-depth article (really, really in depth) it is explained that there is some corned beef in Ireland, but it isn’t even close to being the national dish. Though, some places do serve corned beef and cabbage on St. Patrick’s day, they are serving it for tourists.

What the heck am I going on about corned beef for? This recipe isn’t for corned beef. I guess the point I am trying to make is that there are other things you can make for your St. Patrick’s day party. Take this Dublin Coddle recipe I posted last year, for example. Or this Steak and Stout Pie I hope to eventually get around to talking about.

Steak & Stout Pie Ingredients

You can use any stout you like, but I don’t recommend anything labeled as “extra stout” or “imperial stout”. These are higher in alcohol, and since the pressure cooker doesn’t let any steam escape once it reaches pressure, it will be too strong of a flavor and these stronger ones can also result in a bitter flavor.

This recipe is kind of a hybrid recipe, as the filling is made in the pressure cooker but then is cooked in the oven to cook the crust. I use frozen puff pastry for the crust, so it is still a relatively quick recipe. It is best to let the filling cool for an hour or so before putting the crust on top because if the crust becomes too warm it will not be flaky, and as anyone will tell you, I know flaky.

I like to use frozen pearl onions, but if you can’t find them, or already have onions on hand, a large chopped onion will work fine. The onions mostly break down during the cooking time anyway, I just think the pearl ones lend kind of a nice, sweet flavor to this recipe.

Meat Cut

Cut about 2 pounds of chuck into 1-inch cubes. Heat a couple tablespoons of oil in the pressure cooker pot over medium heat. Put as much of the meat as will comfortably in the pressure cooker pot and brown on two sides. I usually only brown about half of the meat. That is enough to add the browned flavor and it saves a little time. Remove this to a plate.

Meat In Pan

Now brown the onions. Add another splash of oil if necessary. Sauté the onions until they start to caramelize. Remove these to a bowl. Do not remove these to a plate unless you would like to chase pearl onions around your kitchen (don’t ask me how I know this).

Onions In Bowl

Next, sauté a chopped shallot and  four cloves of  pressed garlic until the shallot starts to soften. Add the carrot and sauté for a few minutes until it softens slightly.

Now add a couple teaspoons of Herbes De Provence, a tablespoon of Worcestershire sauce, a tablespoon of tomato paste and some ground black pepper. Don’t add any salt at this point, you can adjust that later. Between the cheese and the beef bouillon, you may not need any additional salt at all.

Ingredients In Pan

Add 1/2 cup of stout and stir everything together.

Dump the onions and meat back in.

Add 1 cup water and 2 teaspoons Better Than Bouillon (you can substitute 1 cup of beef stock for the 1 cup of water and the Better Than Bouillon.

PC Times

Put the cover on the pressure cooker and bring to high pressure.

When high pressure is reached, set the timer for 20 minutes.

While this is cooking, it is a perfect time to grate 8 ounces of sharp cheddar cheese, then after the cheese is grated, make a slurry of two level tablespoons of flour and 1/4 cup of water. Now that you’ve got those two things out of the way, grab what’s left in that bottle (or can) of stout and relax for a few minutes until the timer sounds.

Slurry

When the timer sounds, quickly down the rest of the beer, then go over and take the pressure cooker off the heat. If you have an electric pressure cooker, turn it off. Let the pressure come down naturally for ten minutes, then do a quick release.

Uncover the pressure cooker, then put over medium heat, or put on “medium” sauté setting on your electric pressure cooker. Stir in the flour and water mixture and continue to stir for a couple minutes. Stir in about half the cheese, stirring in a little at a time. Continue to stir for about five minutes more to cook out most of the flour taste.

Filling In Pan 1

Now, at this point you have a pot of Steak and Stout Stew, and if you really want to (or if you are pressed for time) you can stop now and serve over mashed potatoes or with good bread, but you should keep stirring over medium heat for about another five minutes to make really sure that the flour taste is cooked out. But hey, you’ve come this far, you might as well take it all the way and go for the whole pie experience.

Let the filling cool for 60-90 minutes if you have time. This is where a little foresight would have come in handy and you would have bought an extra can of stout. If that is the case, open that baby up and enjoy.

Preheat your oven to 425 degrees. Set a sheet of puff pastry out to thaw. It should be pliable enough to work with but still cold. If it gets too warm, the layers will meld together and your pastry won’t be puffy and flaky. On a floured work surface, roll out your dough until it is an inch or so wider than your pie pan.

Crust Unrolled

Pour filling into a pie pan or au gratin dish about 9 or 10 inches in diameter. Sprinkle the rest of the cheese over the filling. Place the crust on top of the pan. Trim the edges to round it off. Roll the edges up until they only slightly protrude over the edge of the pan. Brush the top with beaten egg. Score the top in a cross-hatch pattern then pierce the top a few times.

Crust Uncooked

Place the pan on a baking sheet (it is certain to bubble over, and better a baking sheet than the bottom of your oven). Set the timer for twenty minutes. Check on it after about fifteen minutes just to be safe. When the timer goes off, check that it looks brown and flaky. If not, give it another few minutes.

Take the pie out of the oven and let it cool for about five minutes. Cut the crust into four pieces and serve.

Pie_Cooked

It makes four generous portions.

Sláinte Mhaith!

Pressure Cooker Steak and Stout Pie
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Recipe type: Entree
Cuisine: Irish
Author:
Prep time:
Cook time:
Total time:
Serves: 4
Celebrate Saint Patrick's day with some tasty pub fare
Ingredients
For The Filling
  • 2 tablespoons cooking oil
  • 2 pounds chuck steak
  • 8 oz. by weight frozen pearl onions
  • 1 shallot, chopped
  • 4 cloves garlic, crushed with garlic press
  • 1 carrot, chopped
  • 2 teaspoons Herbes De Provence
  • 1 tablespoon Worcestershire Sauce
  • 1 tablespoon tomato paste
  • ½ cup stout beer
  • 1 cup water plus ¼ cup water
  • 2 teaspoons beef flavor Better Than Bouillon (you can substitute 1 cup of beef stock for 1 cup water and the Better Than Buillon)
  • 2 level tablespoons flour mixed with the ¼ cup water
  • 8 ounces grate sharp cheddar cheese
For The Crust
  • 1 sheet frozen puff pastry
  • 1 egg, beaten
Instructions
For The Filling
  1. Put the pressure cooker pot over medium heat (or the medium sauté setting of your electric pressure cooker
  2. Brown about half of the meat, then remove to plate
  3. Add another splash of oil, if needed
  4. Sauté the pearl onions until they start to caramelize and remove to bowl
  5. Sauté the shallot and garlic until the shallot starts to soften
  6. Add the carrot and sauté for a couple more minutes
  7. Add the Herbes De Provence, Worcestershire Sauce, Tomato Paste and stout
  8. Add some black pepper to taste
  9. Pour in the 1 cup water and Better Than Bouillon Beef Flavor
  10. Add the meat and onions back to the pot
  11. Cover the pressure cooker and bring to high pressure
  12. Set timer for 20 minutes
  13. When timer sounds remove the pressure cooker from heat (or turn off electric pressure cooker)
  14. Let pressure come down naturally for 10 minutes then use quick release
  15. Put pot back on medium heat
  16. Stir in the flour & water mixture
  17. Stir for around 7 minutes to cook out the flour taste
  18. Stir half of the cheese a little at time
  19. Remove from heat and let the mixture cool for 60-90 minutes
  20. Adjust salt & pepper to taste (you may not need any salt at all)
For The Crust
  1. Preheat oven to 425 degrees
  2. Thaw 1 sheet of frozen puff pastry (I found it takes about 20 minutes to thaw. It should still be cold, but pliable enough to work with).
  3. Beat 1 egg
  4. Roll out pastry until it is large enough to cover a 9-10 inch pie pan or Au Gratin Dish
  5. Pour filling in pie pan then sprinkle the rest of the cheese over the filling
  6. Place pastry on top
  7. Trim the crust to round it off about ½-inch beyond the edge of the pan
  8. Roll up edges until they are just past the edge of the pan
  9. Brush beaten egg over top of crust
  10. Score crust in a cross-hatch pattern and pierce crust several times near center
  11. Place pan on a baking sheet and place on middle rack of oven
  12. Set timer for 20 minutes
  13. Check a couple times to make sure the crust does not get overdone
  14. When 20 minutes check crust. If it looks nicely browned and flaky, remove from oven. If not done, give it a couple more minutes
  15. Remove from oven and let cool for 5 minutes
  16. Cut crust into 4 sections and put on plates

Pressure Cooker Steak Pizzaiola

As Seen On TV! Steak Pizzaiola!

STEAK_PASTA3

My recipe wasn’t seen on TV, of course, but it seems that most people here in the U.S. came to hear of Steak Pizzaiola from one of two sources: 1. Everybody Loves Raymond or 2The Sopranos.

SPIZZ_ING

I know, I know. As usual I left a couple things out of the ingredients picture. Pretend there are bay leaves, wine and honey in this photo.

I happen to fall into the Raymond camp. Since HBO is too rich for my blood, I have never seen an episode of The Sopranos. But however you came to hear of it, Steak Pizzaiola is a quick and easy meal and an excellent way to use some of the cheaper cuts of steak, and lately for me it’s been all about the budget.

TRI-TIP

I always use Tri-Tip, but I have been led to believe that this particular cut of meat is sometimes difficult to find outside of California. But any low-cost cut of steak should work fine. Of course, high-cost steak would also work fine, but that’s a little beside the point of this recipe. Flank steak, skirt steak or round steak would be good for this dish.

TRI-TIP_BROWNING

Lately I have been hooked on Mutti finely chopped tomatoes, so that’s what I used. I still use Pomi quite often as well. Depending on what type of canned tomatoes you use, it may affect the amount of salt you need to add, which is why I usually say “salt to taste”.

SP_SAUCE1

Some people add other ingredients such as onions and mushrooms, which you can do if you like. If using mushrooms, you should wait until after the pressure cooking to add them.

STEAK_SLICED

I prefer keeping it simple without the extra ingredients. I usually serve it on pasta, but it also goes great with mashed potatoes. Or just on its own, with some veggies or salad on the side!

SP_STEAK_W_SAUCE

After browning the meat and adding the garlic, I use just a splash of red wine to deglaze and get the yummy bits off the bottom of the pan. Just a touch of sherry vinegar or a touch of broth would works also, if you don’t have any wine or prefer not to use it. It would probably not be worth buying a full bottle of wine for just a splash. Fortunately for me, no wine ever goes to waste at my place.

Give it a try and let me know how you like it.

Mangia! Mangia!

Pressure Cooker Steak Pizzaiola
Print
Recipe type: Entree
Cuisine: Italian
Author:
Prep time:
Cook time:
Total time:
Serves: 4
A dish made popular on a couple of American TV shows, this quick and easy meal makes a great weekday meal.
Ingredients
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 2 pounds Tri-Tip steak (flank steak, skirt steak or round steak will work also)
  • 4-5 cloves of garlic, crushed (you can add more or less to your liking)
  • 1 splash of red wine (you can sub white wine, sherry vinegar, or a little broth)
  • 1 teaspoon honey or brown sugar
  • 2 14 oz. cans (or 1 28 oz. can) crushed or pureed tomatoes
  • 1 tablespoon tomato paste
  • 1 teaspoon oregano (generous)
  • ½ teaspoon basil
  • ½ teaspoon thyme
  • ¼ teaspoon fennel
  • ½ teaspoon crushed red pepper flakes (use more or less to your preference)
  • 2 bay leaves
  • salt and pepper to taste
  • Parmesan for topping
Instructions
  1. Heat oil in pressure cooker pan over medium-high heat
  2. Season steak with salt and pepper
  3. Brown steak on both sides, then remove to a plate
  4. Lower heat to medium and add garlic
  5. Sautee for a couple minutes until garlic starts to soften
  6. Add a splash of red wine to deglaze, scraping the tasty bits off the bottom
  7. Add in the honey, tomatoes, tomato paste, oregano, basil, thyme, fennel, bay leaves and crushed red pepper
  8. Season with salt and pepper
  9. Stir sauce, then add meat back to pan
  10. Raise heat to high and cover pressure cooker
  11. When high pressure is reached, lower heat to maintain high pressure
  12. Set timer for 30 minutes
  13. When timer sounds, remove pressure cooker from heat and let pressure come down naturally
  14. Remove meat to plate and let rest and cool for at least 5 minutes
  15. Slice the meat thinly and add back into sauce
  16. Serve over pasta and top with freshly grated Parmesan