Ground Beef Curry

Is it Keema Curry? Is it Dry Curry? I Call It Ground Beef Curry.

Ground Beef Curry1

I’ll just call it Ground Beef Curry for now. I set out to duplicate the filling of an Aussie Curry Pie that I had recently, but once I started getting the recipe figured out I realized that without the pie element it is basically the same as Indian Keema Curry or Japanese Dry Curry, but it is still tasty nonetheless.

After spending the week trying to get everything just right, I started coming up with different ways to serve this, just to have a little variety. And this  made me discover just how versatile this ground beef curry can be.

Ground Beef Curry Sliders

I started out more traditionally with Curry and Rice. By the end of the week I was getting a little crazy. My Ground Beef Curry Poutine was my favorite, but the sliders I had tonight were great as well.

Ground Beef Curry Poutine

A little different from typical curries which can be quite “saucy”, this is almost like Indian Sloppy Joes. The possibilities are endless (ok, maybe not exactly endless, but it is quite versatile). If you have any ideas how to use it, let me know!

So, here’s how to make it:

Ground Beef Curry Ingredients

Heat a few tablespoons of coconut oil over medium-high heat in pressure cooker pot. Any oil will do (well, maybe not Quaker State), but I prefer coconut oil with this recipe.

Lightly brown a couple pounds of ground beef, breaking it up as it cooks.

Ground Beef

When the beef is browned, drain most of the fat, leaving enough to sauté the onion.

Scooch (you heard me, scooch) the beef to one side and add a diced onion.

Sauté the onion until it starts to soften, then add 4 or 5 cloves of garlic, run through a press,  and sauté for another minute or so.

Ground Beef with Onions

Stir together the meat, onion and garlic and add in the 1 tablespoon Curry Powder, a tablespoon of Garam Masala, 1 teaspoon of Cayenne (less if you don’t like it so “Zesty”) and 1/2 teaspoon Salt and 1/4 teaspoon black Pepper.

Let it cook for 30 seconds or so, stirring the spices into the beef mixture.

Ground Beef Curry Spices

At this point pour in a cup of tomato sauce and 1/2 cup water, along with the a teaspoon of beef base (I use Better Than Bouillon, but you can substitute 1/2 cup of beef stock for the water and BTB).

Ground Beef Curry Pre Cook

Add 1 tablespoon of Worcestershire Sauce, a tablespoon of soy sauce and a cup of frozen peas, then give it a stir. Peas should still be frozen, no need to thaw.

Drop 2 bay leaves on top, wave goodbye, and lock the cover on the pressure cooker.

Turn the heat to high and bring the pressure cookers to high pressure.

When high pressure is reached, adjust the heat to maintain high pressure and set your timer for 5 minutes.

When time is up, remove the pot from heat and do a quick release.

The curry should be fairly thick, not saucy (about the consistency of Sloppy Joes). If it seems too liquid, you can place it over medium high heat for a few minutes to reduce a bit.

Ground Beef Curry Cooked

Discard bay leaf and serve with rice, pita bread, naan or fries. I think my favorite way to serve this was my Poutine I made with it a couple days ago. For this, serve it over french fries with some cheese curds and sliced hard boiled egg on top. I had the Ground Beef Curry quite a few times this week, but I still have a hankerin’ (did I really say hankerin”?) for the Ground Beef Curry Poutine.

The printable recipe is right here:

Ground Beef Curry
Print
Recipe type: Entree
Cuisine: Asian
Author:
Prep time:
Cook time:
Total time:
Serves: 4-6 servings
Ingredients
  • 3 tablespoons oil (I used coconut oil)
  • 2 pounds ground beef
  • 1 medium onion, diced
  • 4 cloves garlic, put through a press
  • 1 tablespoon Madras Curry Powder
  • 1 tablespoon Garam Masala
  • 1 teaspoon cayenne
  • ½ teaspoon kosher salt
  • ¼ teaspoon black pepper
  • 1 cup tomato sauce
  • ½ cup water
  • 1 teaspoon beef base (I use Better Than Bouillon, ½ cup beef stock can be used instead of the water and beef base)
  • 1 tablespoon Worcestershire Sauce
  • 1 tablespoon soy sauce
  • 1 cup frozen peas
  • 2 bay leaves
Instructions
  1. Heat coconut oil over medium-high heat in pressure cooker pot
  2. Lightly brown the ground beef, breaking it up as it cooks
  3. When beef is browned, drain most of the fat, leaving enough to sauté the onion
  4. Move beef to one side and add the onion
  5. Sauté the onion until it starts to soften
  6. Add the garlic and sauté for another minute
  7. Stir together the meat, onion and garlic
  8. Add in the Curry Powder, Garam Masala, cayenne and salt and pepper
  9. Cook for 30 seconds or so, stirring the spices into the beef mixture
  10. Pour in the tomato sauce and water, along with the beef base
  11. Add the Worcestershire Sauce, soy sauce and frozen peas and give it a stir
  12. Drop 2 bay leaves on top and lock the cover on the pressure cooker
  13. Turn heat to high and bring to high pressure
  14. When high pressure is reached, adjust heat to maintain high pressure and set timer for 5 minutes
  15. When time is up, remove from heat and do a quick release
  16. It should be fairly thick, not saucy (about the consistency of Sloppy Joes). If it seems too liquid, you can place over medium high heat for a few minutes to reduce a bit.
  17. Discard bay leaf and serve with rice, pita bread, naan or fries.

 

Steamed Sliders a la Pressure Cooker

I often get inspiration from food shows such as “Diners, Drive-Ins and Dives” and “Man Vs. Food”, which means that I often use the Pressure Cooker, a potentially healthy method of cooking, to make junk food (though I contend that it is still healthier than some of the other methods of preparing such things). One such inspiration was when Adam Richman, of Man Vs. Food was visiting Ted’s in Connecticut, whose specialty is Steamed Cheeseburgers.

Since there is an entire country between where I live in SoCal, and Ted’s on the East Coast, I figured I wouldn’t be able to visit there any time soon, especially considering that I was craving a steamed cheeseburger now. Oddly enough, my home kitchen is not outfitted with a special cheeseburger steamer, but I started thinking, which is often a dangerous proposition, “Hmmm… I don’t have a special cheeseburger steamer, but I do have one of the finest means of creating steam in existence – my pressure cooker!” And while I was at it, I got the inspiration to combine the steamed cheeseburgers with the sliders that are dear to my heart thanks to my mid-west upbringing, and besides, sliders would fit better in the pressure cooker.

Sliders Ingredients

Once I had my plan in place, I headed to the local Trader Joe’s to pick up the necessary ingredients – a pound on 80/20 ground beef, a hunk of sharp cheddar, and Trader Joe’s mini hamburger buns along with a couple sweet potatoes to make an accompaniment of homemade sweet potato chips.

That evening I gathered the ingredients and got to work preparing vittles for myself and the S.O.

I had a pound of meat and 8 buns, so it didn’t take a genius to figure out that I would make 8 2-ounce burgers. I got out my trusty kitchen scale and started forming the balls. After the first one, it was easy to grab 2-ounce pieces. Sometimes I wish I hadn’t gotten a scale that so closely resembles my iPad. Often is the time I have nearly slapped a slab of meat down onto my iPad, only to catch myself in time and exclaim “Oh, crap!”, except for the time it was a fish and I exclaimed “Oh, carp!”

With steamed cheeseburgers, the cheese is melted in a separate container along with the burgers. It took a bit of kludging, but I managed to rig up a makeshift burger steamer using a stainless steel pressure cooker insert, a tripod and a mini cocotte which came as a bonus with my Staub dutch oven.
The eight burgers were a tight fit, but I got them all in, and using the tripod and cocotte, I suspended the cheese container above the burgers.
For the steaming liquid, I used one of my favorites, beer (it’s not just for drinking anymore). I used Anchor Steam, a California favorite, simply because that’s what I had on hand

I turned on the burner, locked the top on the cooker and let it get up to full pressure.

I kept it at full pressure for five or six minutes before removing it from the heat. I did a quick release and opened ‘er up. There I gazed upon eight succulent slabs of deliciousness, and a container of gooey, melty cheese.
The secret to sliders is to not try to pile much onto the tiny buns. I opted for a pickle slice, a few diced onions and some thousand island dressing.
Although I had used the trick of making an indent in each patty to compensate for the burgers expanding in the center, some of them still bore an uncanny resemblance to meatballs. I will probably try to make them a bit flatter next time.

After I placed them on the buns, I spooned some of the melted cheese on top, placed them on the plate next to the homemade sweet potato chips (which were quite tasty, despite the burn marks on my arm), and dug in.