Pressure Cooker Smoky Swiss Steak

A Smoky Twist On The Classic

Swiss Steak Reduced

I don’t know if there is actually anything Swiss about this dish. According to Wikipedia there actually is a way of preparing steak in Switzerland that is similar to this, but I don’t know if I’m buying it.

My guess is that tenderizing the meat by poking holes in it recalls Swiss Cheese, but that is just my guess.

Swiss Steak Ingredients

This is something I grew up with. I don’t think I have seen it once since I have been on the West Coast, but in Michigan we probably had it once a week or so the entire time I was growing up.

Speaking of the West Coast, temperatures are still in the nineties, so once again I got up early to do my cooking. I have posted salad recipes for the past few weeks, but from what I hear, it is actually seeming like Autumn in parts of the country (and the rest of the world), so I thought I would prepare something a bit more Autumn-y for those of you not sweating in a hot apartment.

Meat Whole

I used top round, but bottom round or chuck will work fine. Sirloin would work, but that’s getting into spendy territory, which you are probably trying to avoid if you are making this type of dish.

Start by taking 1-1/2 to 2 pounds of meat and cut into serving-size pieces, which would probably be 4 pieces for 1-1/2 pounds and about 6 pieces for 2 pounds. I did this by cutting my steak in half, so I have two pieces. Now, cut each of these pieces horizontally through the center so that it is half as thick as before. The goal is to end up with four equal-sized pieces, which I failed miserably at.

Meat Divided

Now, go to town on them with one of these poundy poky things:

Mallet

You don’t need to get it super-thin, you just want to get all the meat to a fairly uniform thickness.

Meat Tenderized

Slice a couple small onions. I used “The Widowmaker” (my nickname for my mandoline). This will make short work of those onions (and anything else that you might get a little too close to it).

Slice a large green pepper into thin strips and press a couple cloves of garlic.

Onion_Mandoline

The “smoky” part of this Swiss Steak comes from using fire-roasted tomatoes and smoked paprika.

In a couple tablespoons of coconut oil (or any cooking oil), brown the steak lightly on both sides. It is pretty thin at this point, so you don’t want to overdo it. Do a couple at a time so you don’t overcrowd the pan. Remove to a plate.

Meat Browning

Add the onions and peppers to the pan (adding a bit more oil if necessary) and sauté until they start to soften a bit. Toss in the garlic and continue to sauté for another minute or so.

Onions_Peppers_CookingAdd just a splash of red wine to deglaze the pan. Now, pour in a can of fire-roasted tomatoes, a tablespoon of tomato paste, some Worcestershire sauce, the smoked paprika, a little dried thyme and some salt and pepper.

Veggies_PanAdd the meat to the pan and toss in a couple bay leaves.

Swiss Steak Cooked

Lock the cover on the pan and turn heat to high.

Bring it to high pressure, then adjust heat to maintain high pressure.

Set the time for 20 minutes.

When the time is up, remove from heat and let pressure come down on its own for 10 minutes, then do a quick release.

Swiss Steak Reduced2

If you would like the sauce a bit thicker, put over medium-high heat for 5-7 minutes until it cooks down to desired thickness.

Serve with potatoes, rice or egg noodles.

 

 

Pressure Cooker Smoky Swiss Steak
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Recipe type: Entree
Cuisine: American
Author:
Prep time:
Cook time:
Total time:
Serves: 4 servings
Fire roasted tomatoes and smoked paprika give a slightly smoky twist to this classic
Ingredients
  • 2 tablespoons coconut oil, or other cooking oil
  • 1-1/2 to 2 pounds round or chuck steak, cut into individual portions
  • 2 small or one large sweet onion, thinly sliced
  • 1 large green bell pepper, sliced into thin strips
  • 2-3 cloves garlic, pressed
  • 1 splash red wine
  • 1 can fire-roasted tomatoes
  • 1 tablespoon tomato paste
  • 1 tablespoon Worcestershire sauce
  • 1 tablespoon brown sugar
  • 1 teaspoon smoked paprika
  • 1 teaspoon dried thyme
  • 1 teaspoon salt (or to taste), more for seasoning meat
  • ½ teaspoon black pepper (or to taste), more for seasoning meat
  • 2 bay leaves
Instructions
  1. Tenderize steaks with spiky side of mallet and season with a little salt and pepper
  2. Heat oil in pressure cooker pot over medium-high heat
  3. Brown meat lightly on both sides and set aside on plate
  4. Sauté onions and peppers until slightly soft (add a little more oil if necessary)
  5. Add the garlic and continue to sauté for another minute
  6. Add a splash of red wine to deglaze the pan, scraping any brown bits off the bottom of the pan
  7. Add the fire-roasted tomatoes and tomato paste
  8. Add the Worcestershire sauce, brown sugar, paprika, thyme and salt and pepper
  9. Stir, then add meat back to pan
  10. Toss a couple bay leaves on top
  11. Lock the lid on the pressure cooker and bring to high pressure
  12. When high pressure is reached, adjust heat to maintain high pressure and set time for 20 minutes
  13. When time is up, remove from heat and let pressure come down on its own for ten minutes, then do a quick release
  14. Serve meat and sauce with rice, egg noodles or potatoes.

Pressure Cooker Matambre

The Argentinian Favorite Matambre Done Pressure Cooker Quick

Matambre2

Don’t cry for me, Argentina, I think my version of your national dish turned out pretty well!

So, what’s the difference between Bracciole, Rouladen, Matambre and various other rolled meat dishes? A lot of it has to do with the filling and the sauce. I have made Rouladen plenty of times before, and there are some similarities, except that the Rouladen is made as smaller, individual rolls, whereas the Matambre is one large roll that is then sliced into individual pieces.

Matambre Ingredients

The tricky part of this recipe is butterflying the flank steak. If you have a butcher who will do this for you, take advantage of it. Don’t be a hero! If you do it yourself, you will end up with a few tears (you can read this as either word that shares this spelling, they both will be true). Fortunately the meat I bought had another smaller piece with it, so that I was able to make a couple patches to fix the holes that I wound up with. If you don’t happen to have a meat patch kit, just push together as best you can.

Flank Steak Seasoned

For the butterflying, lay the meat on a cutting board with the grain running vertically as you are looking at it. With a sharp knife (I used a boning knife), carefully slice through the center, stopping about an inch away from the edge, so that you can open it like a book.

Open it up and cover with plastic wrap.

Using a flat mallet, pound until it is all a uniform thickness (it does not have to be super thin, just try to get it even).

Now, turn the meat 90 degrees so that the grain is running horizontally.

Flank Steak w:garlic

Sprinkle the meat with salt, pepper and oregano.

Sprinkle on the chopped garlic.

Arrange thin slices of onion on steak, leaving about an inch on all sides.

Lay the spinach leaves over the onions. I bought the pre-washed, bagged spinach to make things easy.

Arrange the carrots in rows going across the meat horizontally. I kept the carrots whole since they were small, but next time I will cut them in half because the thicker parts were a little crunchier than I prefer. Also, I didn’t peel them, because they were small and I didn’t want to peel away most of the carrot. If your carrots are larger, you can peel them and cut into quarters.

Matamabre Pre-Roll

Next, place the whole boiled eggs near the center in a single row.

Sprinkle olives around, over the top of the other fillings.

Get about 6 pieces of cooking twine ready, long enough to fit around the rolled steak.

Starting at the bottom, roll the meat toward the top, jelly roll style, keeping it tight.

When you are finished rolling it, place the seam on the bottom.

Using the cooking twine, tie it near each end, then tie 3-4 times in between.

Matambre Pre-Cook

Add 1-1/2 cups water to the pressure cooker pot and turn heat to high. This recipe works best in a wider pressure cooker, but roll can be cut into 2 pieces to fit into a narrower cooker. I cooked this in my Fissler, and I was barely able to fit it in one piece with a little bending.

Stir in 1 teaspoon of beef base (I use better than bouillon) and a little salt and pepper. The beef base has quite a bit of salt, so you won’t need much. You can substitute 1-1/2 cups of beef stock for the water and beef base. Add a splash of red wine.

Add the matambre into the pressure cooker pot, seam side down.

Matambre Rolled2

Add two bay leaves then lock the cover on the pressure cooker and bring to high pressure.

When high pressure is reached, reduce heat to maintain high pressure and set time for 16 minutes.

When time is up, remove pressure cooker from heat and let pressure come down on its own for 10 minutes, then do a quick release.

Let the matambre rest for at least 10 minutes. It can also be cooled and served at room temperature.

Slice into 1-inch slices. Can be served with or without some of the pan sauce. I served it cool, so didn’t use any of the pan sauce.

Traditionally, matambre is served with chimichurri sauce, but I was too lazy to make some. If you would like to make some, here is a recipe from a reliable source. There are a lot of other recipes online if you would like to try a different one.

Matambre3

I just served the sliced room temperature matambre with some roasted red potatoes and it was just right for the relatively warm (but not super hot) temperatures we have been having this week.

Pressure Cooker Matambre
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Recipe type: Entree
Cuisine: Argentinian
Author:
Prep time:
Cook time:
Total time:
Serves: 4 servings
Stuffed Flank Steak Argentinian Syle
Ingredients
  • 2 pounds flank steak
  • ½ onion, thinly sliced
  • 3 ounces or so fresh spinach
  • 4-6 small carrots, halved (if larger, cut into quarters)
  • ½ cup green olives with pimentos
  • 4 cloves garlic, chopped
  • 3 boiled eggs, peeled
  • salt
  • pepper
  • oregano
  • 1-1/2 cups water
  • 1 teaspoon beef base (can substitute 1-1/2 cups beef broth for the water and beef base)
Instructions
  1. Butterfly and pound the flank steak (see method above)
  2. Arrange on a cutting board with the grain running horizontally
  3. Sprinkle with salt, pepper and oregano
  4. Sprinkle on the chopped garlic
  5. Arrange slices of onion on steak
  6. Lay spinach leaves over onions
  7. Arrange carrots in rows going across horizontally
  8. Place eggs near the center in a row
  9. Sprinkle olives around over the top
  10. Starting at the bottom, roll meat toward the top, jelly roll style, keeping tight
  11. Place seam on the bottom
  12. Using butcher twine, tie near each end, with 3-4 pieces in the middle
  13. Add 1-1/2 cups water to pressure cooker pot and turn heat to high
  14. Stir in the beef base and a little salt and pepper
  15. Add a splash of red wine
  16. Add the tied meat into the pressure cooker pot (if you pot is narrower, you may have to cut the roll in half)
  17. Add two bay leaves then lock the cover on the pot and bring to high pressure
  18. When high pressure is reached, reduce heat to maintain high pressure
  19. Set time for 16 minutes
  20. When time is up remove from heat and let pressure come down on its own for 10 minutes, then do a quick release
  21. Let rest for at least 10 minutes, or it can be cooled and served at room temperature or cooled slightly.
  22. Slice into 1-inch slices. Can be served with or without some of the pan sauce. Can also be served with Chimichurri Sauce

 

Pressure Cooker Chicken Quesadilla

Just Don’t Call It A “Cheese” Quesadilla!

Quesadilla_Plate_Top

Looking around the interwebs at various recipes for Quesadillas, there seemed to be quitej a few recipes for “Cheese Quesadillas” (yes even Paula Deen doesn’t know any better), “Cheesy Quesadillas”. But seeing as how “Queso” is Spanish for cheese, that would be akin to posting a recipe for a “Tuna-y Tuna Sandwich”.

Chicken_Ingredients

But this recipe is for a quesadilla with the addition of chicken, so “Chicken Quesadilla” is appropriate.

Sure, there are quicker Chicken Quesadilla recipes, but this one has a tasty, braised chicken filling that would take longer if prepared in a conventional manner.

Tortillas_Cheese

I have made a smaller batch of this in my stovetop pressure cookers, but in my electric the minimum liquid is 1.5 cups, so a larger batch of chicken is necessary.

Cheese_Grated

This is a bit of a hybrid recipe, in that it utilizes the pressure cooker as well as the oven or griddle. I probably would do them on a griddle if I had one, but because of the size limits of my kitchen that probably will not happen soon.

Tortillas

This can also be done with smaller tortillas, using two tortillas with one on the top and one on the bottom, but my preference is to use large “burrito size” tortillas and fold them. This is also better if cooking them on the griddle, since your can just pivot them from one side to the other, whereas if you were doing it sandwich style, there would be a lot more difficulty in flipping it without losing all of the tasty filling.

I like to use a 9 or 10 inch tortilla. The ones I used this time were 12 inch and a little difficult to work with.

Chicken_Cubed

So let’s make the chicken filling. If you want to make the chicken dicing a little easier, you can pop the chicken breasts in the freezer for about 15 minutes or so to firm it up a bit.

In a couple tablespoons of your favorite cooking oil (it doesn’t have to be your favorite, your are welcome to cook in one you hate if you really want to), sauté a chopped onion until it becomes translucent. Add in 5 cloves of garlic (smashed with a press) and sauté for another minute.

Onions_Garlic

Add a couple pounds of cubed boneless, skinless chicken breast and cook until the outside starts to turn white.

Quesadilla_Spices

Add the oregano, cumin, salt and pepper and stir together.

Pour in 1/2 cup of beer and stir it all together.

Chicken_Beer

Add two cans of Ro-Tel, after draining the liquid from one of the cans.

Chicken_Rotel

Put the pressure cooker over high heat (if using an electric PC, switch to pressure mode). Put top on the pressure cooker and bring to high pressure.

When high pressure is reached, adjust heat to maintain high pressure and set time for 3 minutes.

When time is up, do a quick release.

Remove the top from the pressure cooker.

Chicken_Cilantro

Put pot over high heat (for electrics switch to the highest sauté or brown mode.

Add about 1/2 cup loosely packed cilantro and simmer for 8-10 minutes until the mixture is reduced to desired thickness.

So, that’s it for the filling. Let’s put together our quesadillas.

Preheat the oven to 400 degrees.

Baking_Sheet_Tortillas

Lightly grease a baking sheet. Depending on the size of your tortillas, get out two or three of them (however many will fit on the baking sheet folded in half. If making a lot at once, use two baking sheets.

On one half of each tortilla, put one or two large spoons of the chicken mixture. Put a generous amount of cheese on each one as well.

Tortilla_Folded

Fold each quesadilla in half and put the baking sheets in the oven.

Set timer for 5 minutes.

Quesadilla_Plate_Side

When time is up, remove the baking sheets from the oven and let cool for a few minutes.

Cut into wedges with knife or pizza cutter and top with your favorite toppings.

Pressure Cooker Chicken Quesadilla
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Recipe type: Entree or Appetizer
Cuisine: Mexican American
Author:
Prep time:
Cook time:
Total time:
Serves: 4-8 quesadillas
The Southwest favorite with a tasty chicken filling
Ingredients
For Chicken
  • 2 tablespoons oil
  • 2 pounds skinless, boneless chicken breast, cut into approximately ½" cubes
  • 1 large onion, finely chopped
  • 5 cloves garlic, pressed
  • ½ cup beer
  • 2 teaspoons oregano
  • 2 teaspoons cumin
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • ½ teaspoon black pepper
  • 2 cans Ro-Tel, 1 drained, 1 with liquid (or other canned tomatoes with green chiles)
  • ½ cup (loosely packed) chopped cilantro
For Quesadillas
  • Flour Tortillas (quantity will vary depending on size)
  • 24 oz cheese, grated (I like half Pepper Jack and half Cheddar)
  • Toppings of your choice (I like Salsa, Guacamole and Sour Cream)
Instructions
For Filling
  1. Heat oil over medium-high heat (or medium sauté setting on electric model)
  2. Sauté onions until they become translucent (4-5 minutes)
  3. Add garlic and sauté for another minute
  4. Add in chicken and stir until it takes on a little white color (I prefer the meat not be browned for this recipe)
  5. Add oregano, cumin, salt and pepper and stir to mix
  6. Pour in the beer
  7. Add the can of Ro-tel with juice and the drained can of Ro-tel
  8. Stir, then turn heat to high and place top on pressure cooker (for electric, turn off sauté mode, put top on cooker and set pressure to high)
  9. When high pressure is reached set time to 3 minutes
  10. When time is up, remove from heat and do a quick release
  11. Remove cover from pressure cooker
  12. Place back over medium-high heat
  13. Add chopped cilantro
  14. Bring to low boil for 8-10 minutes, stirring often until mixture thickens
For Quesadillas
  1. Preheat oven to 400 degrees (you can preheat while chicken is cooking)
  2. Lightly grease 1 or 2 baking sheets, depending on how many you want to make at a time
  3. Place two tortillas on sheet (can be hanging off the side since you will be folding) You might be able to get 3 on a sheet if using smaller tortillas
  4. Depending on tortilla size, put one or two large spoons of chicken on one side of each tortilla
  5. Top with generous handful of cheese
  6. Fold tortillas (like a large taco)
  7. Place baking sheet in oven for 5 minutes
  8. Cut quesadillas into wedges with knife or pizza cutter
  9. Serve with whatever topping you like

 

Pressure Cooker Salisbury Steak

The Classic School Lunch “Mystery Meat” Updated For The Pressure Cooker!

DSCF9112

This one brings back memories of sitting in the “cafetorium”, enjoying one of the rare occasions when I was allowed to buy “hot lunch” at school.

I am not even sure if I used to enjoy the school lunchroom’s salisbury steak. What I did enjoy was not having to take my embarrassing lunchbox to school.

Ah yes, the lunchbox. I remember it as if it were yesterday…

When I was in first grade, my mother saved up enough trading stamps (I am sure most of you don’t remember that concept) to order a lunchbox for me to carry my lunch to school. Since they were out of the one that was ordered, they sent what they believed was a suitable replacement.

When the delivery man arrived, I waited with anticipation as my mom opened the package and presented me with a pink-accented lunchbox with a fake picnic basket pattern, with a pink handle and pink butterflies on the lid and inside, and there on the front, emblazoned in an ornate script typeface was the word “Debutante”.

Ok, now I know that I am super-old, since I was able to find the lunch box online, in the Smithsonian Institute of all places. I will probably be joining it there soon. I hate to date myself like this, but maybe it will help you to understand why I was scarred for life by this particular lunchbox.

Debutante_Lunch_Box

Image from Smithsonian Institute Website, click image to go to site

I asked my mom what this word meant, since I was just in first grade and had not yet had a lot of exposure to debutantes. I am not sure if she actually gave me an answer. I seem to recall a lot of stammering on my mother’s part, followed my refusal to be seen in public with such a thing. In order to appease me, my parents went to the store to buy some Con-tact Paper (you may not remember that either, but it is actually still made), a self-adhesive covering often used to cover shelves and other things. The general rule was, if it is ugly, cover it with Contact Paper. In fact, I had a couple awkward years where I think my parents were considering wrapping my face in it. Anyway, my folks selected a manly dark woodgrain to cover my lunch box with. So, instead of carrying a frilly pink lunchbox, I carried what appeared to be a small rumpus room (the covering looked similar to the ugly wood paneling that everyone was covering their basement walls with where I grew up).

Anyway, I was always thrilled when my Mom would hand me two quarters in the morning (geez, I’m old, 50 cents for lunch?), to buy a hot lunch, which was often salisbury steak, with the obligatory mashed potatoes and either peas or corn.

Whether I actually liked it then or not is irrelevant, because it is now one of the ultimate comfort foods for me. So let’s make some!

DSCF9076

Mix together 2 pounds of ground beef, 2 eggs, 1 cup of panko bread crumbs, a tablespoon of Worcestershire Sauce, a teaspoon of salt, 1/2 teaspoon of pepper, 1/2 teaspoon of garlic powder, 1/2 teaspoon of onion powder, 1/4 teaspoon of mustard powder, 1/4 teaspoon of paprika and a teaspoon of dried parsley. Mix with your hands until everything is blended, do not over mix.

DSCF9083

Divide into 4-6 ovals. I made 4, and I admit they were kind of huge, but I was hungry.

DSCF9089

In a couple tablespoons of oil, brown the steaks on both sides. Depending on the dimensions of your cooker, you may have to brown a couple at a time. I just barely could fit mine in my Fissler. It is ok if you overlap them when it is time to put them under pressure, but don’t crowd them when browning.

DSCF9091

Remove them to a plate, then sauté three onions (halved, then sliced). Cook until they just start to take on a bit of brown color.

DSCF9100

Add in 3 cloves of pressed garlic and sauté for another minute or two.

Add the meat back to the pressure cooker pot.

Now, add some salt and pepper, 2-1/2 cups of water, 1 tablespoon Worcestershire Sauce and 1 tablespoon Beef Flavor Better Than Bouillon (you can substitute 2-1/2 cups beef stock for the water and BTB). Add a little salt and pepper.

Place top on pressure cooker and bring to high pressure. When high pressure is reached, adjust heat to maintain high pressure and set time for 8 minutes.

While dish is cooking, mix one tablespoon corn starch with one tablespoon water until smooth.

DSCF9104

When time is up, let pressure come down on its own for 10 minutes, then do a quick release. Be very careful, there is always a chance some of the liquid may spray out the vent.

DSCF9105

Remove the meat to a plate. Put the gravy over medium heat. Do not bring to a boil. Stir in the corn starch mixture and stir for one to one and a half minutes, until thickened. Do not get too aggressive with the stirring, too much and the gravy may get thin again.

You can also cut them in half the long way and have 8 decent size portions.

Taste, and add more salt and pepper, if necessary.

Serve with mashed potatoes or egg noodles and peas or corn.

DSCF9114

 

Pressure Cooker Salisbury Steak
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Recipe type: Entree
Cuisine: American
Author:
Prep time:
Cook time:
Total time:
Serves: 4-8 servings
The school lunch classic made quicker in the pressure cooker
Ingredients
  • 2 pounds ground beef
  • 1 cup bread crumbs
  • 2 eggs
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • ½ teaspoon pepper
  • ½ teaspoon garlic powder
  • ½ teaspoon onion powder
  • ¼ teaspoon mustard powder
  • ¼ teaspoon paprika
  • 1 teaspoon dried parsley
  • 2 tablespoons Worcestershire Sauce, divided
  • 2 tablespoons oil
  • 3 medium onions, halved and sliced
  • 3 cloves garlic, pressed
  • 2-1/2 cups water
  • 1 tablespoon Beef Better Than Bouillon (you can use 2-1/2 cups of beef stock instead of water and BTB)
  • Salt and pepper to taste
Instructions
  1. In a bowl, combine the ground beef, bread crumbs, eggs, 1 teaspoon salt, ½ teaspoon pepper, garlic powder, onion powder, paprika, parsley and 1 tablespoon of the Worcestershire Sauce
  2. Mix together with hands until just blended
  3. Form into 4-6 oval patties
  4. Heat the 2 tablespoons oil in the pressure cooker pot over medium-high heat
  5. Brown the patties on both sides (you may have to do 2-3 at a time, depending on the diameter of your cooker)
  6. Remove meat to a plate
  7. Sauté onions until they just start to pick up a little brown color (5-7 minutes)
  8. Add the garlic and sauté another minute or two
  9. Add the other tablespoon of Worcestershire Sauce, the water and 1 tablespoon of Beef Better Than Bouillon (you can use 2-1/2 cups of beef stock in place of the water and BTB)
  10. Add a little salt and pepper
  11. Cover pressure cooker and turn heat to high
  12. Bring to high pressure
  13. When high pressure is reached, adjust heat to maintain high pressure and set time for 8 minutes
  14. While dish is cooking, mix together 1 tablespoon corn starch and 1 tablespoon water
  15. When time is up, take pressure cooker from heat
  16. Let pressure come down on its own for ten minutes then do a quick release
  17. Remove the meat to a plate
  18. Place gravy over medium heat
  19. Stir in the corn starch mixture, don't bring to a boil
  20. Stir gently for 1-1/2 minutes, don't stir too vigorously as it could make the gravy get thin again
  21. Taste and add more salt and pepper if necessary
  22. Serve with mashed potatoes or egg noodles and corn or peas

 

Pressure Cooker Stout Braised Beef

Beef and Beer, Need I Say More? PC Stout Braised Beef.

Stout Braised Chuck4

It’s funny how the finest things in life begin with “bee”. Beef, beer, beets. Ok, my wife would definitely disagree with that last one. This recipe doesn’t use beets anyway so I am not sure why I even mentioned beets.

Beets aside, chuck roast is fast becoming one of my go-to meats. It’s great for someone on a budget (that would be me), and it turns out great in the pressure cooker. I’ve used it before in recipes such as my Steak and Stout Pie and French Dip. Oddly enough, most of my chuck roast recipes also include beer. Go figure.

Stout Braised Chuck Ingredients

This particular preparation came about because I couldn’t wait to try a new spice blend that I bought. I started out planning to make a traditional pot roast with the carrots and potatoes and whatnot, but I ended up making more of a brisket-style preparation. Maybe because I had thought about making a brisket first, but the chuck roast was cheaper.

Berbere Spice

If you use a pre-made Berbere blend, carefully give it a little taste first. Some of them are spicier than others, so you might want to use a bit less than a tablespoon.

I used a two-pound piece of chuck, but I probably would have gotten a 3 pound one if the store had it. This recipe will still work fine with a 3-pounder.

Chuck Roast

So, to get started, heat a couple tablespoons of oil on medium-high heat and brown the beef on both sides.

Put the meat on a plate and sauté the onion until slightly brown, then add the garlic and sauté for another minute or two.

Add in the spice mix and continue to sauté for another 30 seconds.

Onions and Spices

Plop in that ‘mater paste and mix it all together.

Add a touch of salt and pepper (You can add more at the end. The amount will vary depending on whether or not your spice mix includes salt and pepper, along with personal taste, which is impeccable.)

Onions, Spice Mixed

Now add the Worcestershire Sauce, vinegar, brown sugar and stout.

Pour in the water and add the Better Than Bouillon. You can substitute one cup of beef stock for this.

Add the meat back into the pot.

Guinness Braised Chuck Finished

Toss in the bay leaves, slap the top on the PC and crank the heat to high.

When high pressure is reached, adjust the heat to maintain high pressure.

Set timer for 40 minutes.

When the time is up, let pressure come down on its own for ten minutes, then release the hounds, er, I mean do a quick release.

Finished Meat On Plate

Remove the meat to a plate. If you would like to thicken the sauce a bit (which I did), put the pot back over medium-high heat and bring to a low boil for 7-10 minutes.

Slice the meat and serve with some of the sauce, being sure to put some of the onions on top.

Stout Chuck Sliced

Serve with mashed potatoes and a vegetable (if you are into that sort of thing).

Stout Braised Chuck1

Pressure Cooker Stout Braised Chuck Roast
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Recipe type: Entree
Cuisine: American
Author:
Prep time:
Cook time:
Total time:
Serves: 3-4 servings
A mildly spicy braised roast, quick enough for a weeknight!
Ingredients
  • 2 tablespoons oil
  • 2-3 pounds chuck roast
  • 1 large or two small onions, sliced
  • 4 cloves garlic, pressed
  • 1 tablespoon Berbere Spice Mix (for mix you can sub 1-1/2 teaspoons paprika, ½ teaspoon cayenne pepper, ¼ teaspoon cinnamon, ¼ teaspoon coriander, ¼ teaspoon ginger, ¼ teaspoon allspice)
  • 2 tablespoons tomato paste
  • Salt and pepper to taste
  • 1 tablespoon Worcestershire Sauce
  • 1 tablespoon apple cider vinegar
  • 2 tablespoons brown sugar
  • 1 cup stout beer (such as Guinness)
  • 1 cup water
  • 2 teaspoons Beef Better Than Bouillon
  • 2 bay leaves
Instructions
  1. Heat oil in pressure cooker pot over medium heat
  2. Brown meat on both sides
  3. Remove meat to plate
  4. Add onions to pot, adding a bit more oil if necessary
  5. Sauté onion until it just starts to show some brown
  6. Add garlic and continue to cook for another 1-2 minutes
  7. Add in the spice mix and sauté for another 30 seconds
  8. Add the tomato paste and stir everything together
  9. Add a little salt and pepper (can add more at the end if necessary, after tasting)
  10. Pour in the stout, Worcestershire and vinegar
  11. Add the brown sugar and stir
  12. Add in the water and Better Than Bouillon (can substitute 1 cup beef stock)
  13. Put meat back in pot
  14. Toss the bay leaves on top
  15. Put the lid on the pressure cooker and turn heat to high
  16. When high pressure is reached, adjust heat to maintain high pressure
  17. Set timer for 40 minutes
  18. When time is up, let heat come down on its own for 10 minutes, then do a quick release
  19. Remove meat to a plate
  20. If you would like the sauce a little thicker, put pot back on medium-high heat and bring to a low boil for 7-10 minutes
  21. Slice meat and serve with some of the sauce on top, being sure to get some of the onions too
  22. Goes great with mashed potatoes and a vegetable