Pressure Cooker Black Eyed Peas

Ring In The New Year The Pressure Cooker Way!


Every New Year while growing up, my mother would open a couple cans of black eyed peas, heat them in a saucepan and plop some on the plate, clearing a small space among the ham, sweet potatoes and green bean casserole to fit in the unwelcome legume. It brings good luck for the coming year to eat black eyed peas on New Years!”, my mom would say, as my siblings and I (and probably my dad as well) were thinking “This better bring good luck if I have to suffer through this.” And it’s true, canned black eyed peas with no further treatment are indeed quite bland, and the metallic flavor from the can didn’t help. In fact, my mother was even understanding in this matter, and only insisted that we take just one bite, not wanting any of her brood to hit on hard luck during the year. And I don’t think any of us took more than the one bite necessary to stave off bad luck for another 365 days.


So unpleasant was the experience, that once on my own, it was many years before I braved a bite of black eyed peas again, and it was then that I made the discovery that “Hey, these things can be pretty darn good!”


These days, I not only make black eyed peas for New Year’s (and even other times throughout the year!), but I make them as an entree, not just something relegated to a tiny section of the plate. Served with rice and collard greens, you have yourself an entire meal. And even if the whole luck thing doesn’t pan out, at least you got the year off to a tasty start.


I’m sure that in some parts of this country, and in some other countries as well, some mothers make entirely awesome black eyed peas, but in the northern midwest, they were hard to come by.


So, just in time for the New Year, I bring you Not My Mother’s Black Eyed Peas, a zesty treat, and using the pressure cooker, pretty quick too. Traditionally, these would be made with some type of pork such as bacon, salt pork or ham hocks (which I have absolutely nothing against), but I have really been liking smoked turkey drumsticks lately, so I have used them in this recipe.
I soaked the peas for just a few hours since I just bought them earlier in the day, so cooked them a little longer than if they had been soaked overnight.

Not My Mother's Black Eyed Peas
Prep time:
Cook time:
Total time:
Serves: 6-8
Zesty Black Eyed Peas with smoked turkey drumsticks, celebrate the New Year, or any other time of the year!
  • 1 pound black eyed peas, soaked overnight (or at least a few hours)
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 2 tablespoons butter
  • 1 large onion, chopped
  • 7 or 8 cloves garlic, chopped
  • 1 green bell pepper, chopped
  • 1 red bell pepper, chopped
  • 1 large jalapeño, chopped
  • ½ cup white wine
  • 3 cups low sodium chicken stock
  • 1 can Ro-Tel tomatoes with green chilis
  • 2 cups water
  • 2 tablespoons apple cider vinegar
  • 1 tablespoon worcestershire sauce
  • 1 teaspoon cumin
  • 2 teaspoons chili powder
  • ½ teaspoon celery seed
  • 2 teaspoons oregano
  • ½ teaspoon Cayenne pepper
  • 2 smoked turkey drumsticks
  1. Heat the butter and olive oil in pressure cooker
  2. Add onions and sauté for a couple minutes
  3. Add garlic and peppers, continue sautéing for another minute
  4. Add in white wine, cider and Worcestershire sauce
  5. Pour in chicken stock, Ro-Tel and water
  6. Add the black eyed peas and bring to a simmer
  7. Add cumin, chili powder, celery seed, oregano and cayenne pepper
  8. Add in drumsticks (you can cut the meat off the bone first if you like, I like to put them in whole and remove the meat from the bone later)
  9. Turn heat to high
  10. Lock cover in place and bring to high pressure
  11. When pressure is reached, lower heat to maintain and set timer for 30 minutes
  12. When time is up, remove from heat and let pressure neutralize naturally
  13. If you put the turkey legs in whole, remove them to a plate
  14. Put back on heat, bring to a simmer and stir for a couple minutes
  15. While beans are simmering, cut meat from drumsticks, keeping an eye on the pot
  16. Add turkey meat back in with beans
  17. Add salt and pepper to taste, and remove from heat
  18. Serve with rice and greens


10 thoughts on “Pressure Cooker Black Eyed Peas

  1. yummy. I had ham hocks instead of turley legs and substitued Zatarain’s Creole seasoning for all the spices (lazy). Threw in some Collard greens for good measure. Yum. Topped with grated parm cheese and it was THE BOMB!

  2. Fresh black eyed peas are heavenly. We love growing them, picking and shelling them. Somewhat of a social event in the South. We make poor boy stew by adding turkey German sausage, small baby new potatoes, and shredded cabbage right at the end of cooking. Include a little jalapeno cornbread on he side and you have a great meal. My sons throw a piece of cornbread in the bottom of the bowl and place the stew on top for a mixture of great flavors. We just season with a little sea salt and pepper at the end of pressure cooking.

    • Shae, you are making me hungry! That sounds delicious. I am usually forced to use the dried variety, but I have come across fresh ones in the shell a couple times at the local farmers market, and I have to say it was worth the extra work to shell them, there was no comparison to dried.

  3. I tried these black eyed peas with the pressure cooker I got for Christmas and they turned out fabulous! My hubby doesn’t normally ask me to “keep that recipe” but he was clearly impressed with this one. Thanks!

    • Debbie, thanks for your comments. I’m always happy to hear when recipes turn out well and are appreciated by family members. It seems to me that a lot of people received pressure cookers for Christmas.

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