A Few Minutes With Pressure Cooker Convert

Considering a Pressure Cooker? Pay no attention to the naysayers!

Pressure Cooker Angry Mob copy

I admit it, I’m no Andy Rooney, but I like to think that I can complain with the best of ’em. To that end, I have noticed an alarming trend lately when it comes to discussion boards on cooking.

Sometimes while doing my extensive research on the interwebs (I sacrifice so you don’t have to, you’re welcome), I come across conversations on some of the cooking forums such as this:

Q: I would like to cook a whole chicken in a pressure cooker. Does anyone have any tips? (Any type of meat, grain or vegetable can substituted for “chicken”. The answers are always similar, no matter what.

And every time, most of the answers are along these lines:

Yes, my tip is DON’T.

Why would you want to ruin a good chicken?

You will end up with a pot of mush!

Why would you want a dry flavorless chicken?

Cook the chicken in the oven, and if you MUST use the pressure cooker, make some beans to have with it.

Judging by the answers, it is unlikely that a lot of these folks have never used a pressure cooker at all. It has just been ingrained into their consciences that a PC is something to be feared. An evil, black magic-possessed pot sent here by the devil to do his bidding for him.

They might as well be saying “And risk eternal damnation? I think not. I will just continue using my usual, time-intensive methods of preparing food. And as my family sits down to enjoy a weeknight dinner shortly before midnight, I will thank my lucky stars that I was not lured over to “the dark side” with one of those infernal devices.”

Though I guess  if everyone that says they have experienced an exploding pressure cooker is telling the truth, then sure, there may be reason to be cautious. But the cookers these days have multiple safety features on each one. And the electric models not only have the safety features, but it is also impossible to set the heat too high.

So, instead of giving any kind of constructive advice, these people are not only afraid to try something new, they make it their duty to stop others from trying something new as well. WELL, STOP IT!!!

I’ve been using pressure cookers for a few years new, and I’ve done a lot of experimenting. I admit that some of the experiments have had better results than others, but over these few years never have I ended up with a “pot of mush” or “dry flavorless (insert dish here).

So if you are considering a pressure cooker, pay no mind to the naysayers on some cooking forum. Come on, try it! You won’t be sorry!

 

Pressure Cooker Stout Braised Beef

Beef and Beer, Need I Say More? PC Stout Braised Beef.

Stout Braised Chuck4

It’s funny how the finest things in life begin with “bee”. Beef, beer, beets. Ok, my wife would definitely disagree with that last one. This recipe doesn’t use beets anyway so I am not sure why I even mentioned beets.

Beets aside, chuck roast is fast becoming one of my go-to meats. It’s great for someone on a budget (that would be me), and it turns out great in the pressure cooker. I’ve used it before in recipes such as my Steak and Stout Pie and French Dip. Oddly enough, most of my chuck roast recipes also include beer. Go figure.

Stout Braised Chuck Ingredients

This particular preparation came about because I couldn’t wait to try a new spice blend that I bought. I started out planning to make a traditional pot roast with the carrots and potatoes and whatnot, but I ended up making more of a brisket-style preparation. Maybe because I had thought about making a brisket first, but the chuck roast was cheaper.

Berbere Spice

If you use a pre-made Berbere blend, carefully give it a little taste first. Some of them are spicier than others, so you might want to use a bit less than a tablespoon.

I used a two-pound piece of chuck, but I probably would have gotten a 3 pound one if the store had it. This recipe will still work fine with a 3-pounder.

Chuck Roast

So, to get started, heat a couple tablespoons of oil on medium-high heat and brown the beef on both sides.

Put the meat on a plate and sauté the onion until slightly brown, then add the garlic and sauté for another minute or two.

Add in the spice mix and continue to sauté for another 30 seconds.

Onions and Spices

Plop in that ‘mater paste and mix it all together.

Add a touch of salt and pepper (You can add more at the end. The amount will vary depending on whether or not your spice mix includes salt and pepper, along with personal taste, which is impeccable.)

Onions, Spice Mixed

Now add the Worcestershire Sauce, vinegar, brown sugar and stout.

Pour in the water and add the Better Than Bouillon. You can substitute one cup of beef stock for this.

Add the meat back into the pot.

Guinness Braised Chuck Finished

Toss in the bay leaves, slap the top on the PC and crank the heat to high.

When high pressure is reached, adjust the heat to maintain high pressure.

Set timer for 40 minutes.

When the time is up, let pressure come down on its own for ten minutes, then release the hounds, er, I mean do a quick release.

Finished Meat On Plate

Remove the meat to a plate. If you would like to thicken the sauce a bit (which I did), put the pot back over medium-high heat and bring to a low boil for 7-10 minutes.

Slice the meat and serve with some of the sauce, being sure to put some of the onions on top.

Stout Chuck Sliced

Serve with mashed potatoes and a vegetable (if you are into that sort of thing).

Stout Braised Chuck1

Pressure Cooker Stout Braised Chuck Roast
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Recipe type: Entree
Cuisine: American
Author:
Prep time:
Cook time:
Total time:
Serves: 3-4 servings
A mildly spicy braised roast, quick enough for a weeknight!
Ingredients
  • 2 tablespoons oil
  • 2-3 pounds chuck roast
  • 1 large or two small onions, sliced
  • 4 cloves garlic, pressed
  • 1 tablespoon Berbere Spice Mix (for mix you can sub 1-1/2 teaspoons paprika, ½ teaspoon cayenne pepper, ¼ teaspoon cinnamon, ¼ teaspoon coriander, ¼ teaspoon ginger, ¼ teaspoon allspice)
  • 2 tablespoons tomato paste
  • Salt and pepper to taste
  • 1 tablespoon Worcestershire Sauce
  • 1 tablespoon apple cider vinegar
  • 2 tablespoons brown sugar
  • 1 cup stout beer (such as Guinness)
  • 1 cup water
  • 2 teaspoons Beef Better Than Bouillon
  • 2 bay leaves
Instructions
  1. Heat oil in pressure cooker pot over medium heat
  2. Brown meat on both sides
  3. Remove meat to plate
  4. Add onions to pot, adding a bit more oil if necessary
  5. Sauté onion until it just starts to show some brown
  6. Add garlic and continue to cook for another 1-2 minutes
  7. Add in the spice mix and sauté for another 30 seconds
  8. Add the tomato paste and stir everything together
  9. Add a little salt and pepper (can add more at the end if necessary, after tasting)
  10. Pour in the stout, Worcestershire and vinegar
  11. Add the brown sugar and stir
  12. Add in the water and Better Than Bouillon (can substitute 1 cup beef stock)
  13. Put meat back in pot
  14. Toss the bay leaves on top
  15. Put the lid on the pressure cooker and turn heat to high
  16. When high pressure is reached, adjust heat to maintain high pressure
  17. Set timer for 40 minutes
  18. When time is up, let heat come down on its own for 10 minutes, then do a quick release
  19. Remove meat to a plate
  20. If you would like the sauce a little thicker, put pot back on medium-high heat and bring to a low boil for 7-10 minutes
  21. Slice meat and serve with some of the sauce on top, being sure to get some of the onions too
  22. Goes great with mashed potatoes and a vegetable

 

Sneak Peek – Stout Braised Chuck Roast

Coming This Weekend!

Stout Braised Chuck Roast

A spicy take on Chuck Roast. I started out planning to make classic pot roast with potatoes and carrots and the whole nine yards, but changed my mind because I had just picked up some new spices I was itching to try out.

I used a Berbere spice blend in this particular recipe such as this one and this one, or this perhaps.

You can also make your own like this.

Or you can just fake it.

Details to come one the weekend. See you then!

Pressure Cooker Sauerkraut Soup

I’m sure it’s authentic somewhere!

Soup Bowl3

This is one of those times I started searching for one thing, and a few hours and a couple hundred clicks later, I found myself wanting, no needing, to make Sauerkraut Soup. How a search for Potato Soup ultimately led to this, I am not sure, but I must say I am happy I stumbled upon this. Even though it turned out to be pretty warm the past couple days (as I predicted in my last post), this soup wasn’t so heavy that it was difficult to eat in such conditions, unlike the creamy potato soups that originally started my search.

And, it goes exceptionally well with beer, so that helped alleviate the warm weather issue!

Sauerkraut soup is popular in a lot of places, particularly areas of Eastern Europe, including Polish Kapusniak, German (such as this one from Heidi Klum), Russian Shchi, and even from the US Midwest.

They vary in the meats used, some using beef, some pork and some with multiple meats. Some use only sauerkraut, some a combination of sauerkraut and fresh cabbage.

My primary goal for my version was to follow the Three E’s – Effortless, Economical and Expeditious. And I think I succeeded, if I do say so myself. Using relatively inexpensive Kielbasa as the protein, and just 8 minutes under pressure take care of the economical and expeditious elements. Except for a little minor chopping and sautéing, most of the elements are just dumped in the pressure cooker, which covers the effortless aspect.

Sauerkraut Soup Ingredients

A pound of sausage would be fine, but I used 12 ounces because that seems to be the only size package that I can find around here. I used a 28 ounce jar of sauerkraut, you can use as much as a quart, or less if you would like your soup to be a bit more liquid.

Start by chopping the onion and potato. Run the garlic through a press. Cut the kielbasa in half lengthwise, then slice.

Sausage Chopped

Since I used the InstantPot, these instructions are for that, but it can easily be adapted to another electric or a stovetop cooker. I would keep the same time for whatever method you choose.

Using the sauté setting on medium, heat the oil.

Toss in the onion, sausage and garlic together. Cook until the onion starts to become translucent.

Dump in the potato, paprika, caraway seeds and tomato paste. Stir everything together.

Veg and Potato

Cook for another minute or so.

Add 5-6 grinds of black pepper and about a 1/2 teaspoon of salt (you can adjust this later, the amount needed will vary depending on your sausage and sauerkraut.

Dump in the sauerkraut (including the liquid).

Adding Sauerkraut

Pour in the chicken stock.

Stir in two tablespoons brown sugar (you can add more later if necessary, depending on how sour your sauerkraut is) and a tablespoon of Worcestershire Sauce.

Toss in the two bay leaves.

Before Pressure

Turn off the sauté mode and place the top on the pressure cooker.

Turn the cooker to “soup” mode and set the timer for 8 minutes

InstantPot Soup Mode

When time is up, let pressure release naturally for ten minutes, then do a quick release.

When pressure is completely released, remove the top.

Give it a taste and adjust the salt and brown sugar as necessary.

Soup Finished

Serve topped with sour cream (I highly recommend that you don’t skip this, it adds a lot to this soup) and a little fresh dill.

Rye Bread

With some good buttered rye bread on the side, this makes a complete meal.

Pressure Cooker Sauerkraut Soup
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Recipe type: Entree
Cuisine: Eastern European
Author:
Prep time:
Cook time:
Total time:
Serves: 6-8 servings
Sauerkraut Soup with Potatoes and Sausage - Yum!
Ingredients
  • 1 tablespoon cooking oil
  • 1 package (12-16 ounces) Kielbasa cut in half lengthwise then sliced
  • 1 large onion, chopped
  • 4 cloves garlic, pressed
  • 1 heaping tablespoon Hungarian paprika
  • 1 teaspoon caraway seeds
  • 4-5 medium potatoes (about 1-1/2 pounds), cut into ½-3/4 inch cubes
  • 2 tablespoons tomato paste
  • black pepper
  • salt to taste
  • 1 jar (28-32 ounces) sauerkraut
  • 2 heaping tablespoons brown sugar
  • 1 tablespoon Worcestershire Sauce
  • 1 quart low sodium chicken stock
  • 2 bay leaves
Instructions
  1. Heat the oil over medium heat in pressure cooker pot (if using electric PC, use sauté or brown mode on medium)
  2. Sauté onion, garlic and sausage until the onions start to get translucent
  3. Add paprika and caraway seed and sauté for another couple minutes
  4. Add a couple grinds of black pepper
  5. Add in the potatoes
  6. Drop in 2 tablespoons of tomato paste
  7. Stir everything together
  8. Pour in the chicken stock
  9. Add the brown sugar and Worcestershire Sauce and give it a stir
  10. Toss 2 bay leaves on top
  11. Place top on pressure cooker and turn heat to high (for electric PC, turn off sauté/brown mode, place top on PC and set for high pressure on "soup" mode)
  12. Set timer for 8 minutes
  13. When time is up, let pressure come down naturally for ten minutes, then do a quick release
  14. Serve in bowls topped with sour cream and a little fresh dill

 

Sneak Peek – Sauerkraut Soup

Sauerkraut, potatoes, kielbasa. All the basic food groups. 

Sauerkraut Soup Ingredients

If all goes as planned, this recipe will be up this weekend. Of course, if history is any indication, by the time I get this tasty, warming soup ready to serve it will be 90 degrees outside again (but if the forecast can be trusted it will only be around 80 or so).

If my experimentation over the next couple days pays off, check back on the weekend for my recipe for Pressure Cooker Sauerkraut Soup!

Pressure Cooker Split Pea Soup

Split pea soup? He likes it, Hey Mikey! 

DSCF8875

When I was a youngster, probably my least favorite thing to eat was split pea soup. I absolutely hated it. Just the thought of it brought visions of the Exorcist. No, the movie wasn’t even out yet. I mean the actual exorcist. I wasn’t a very well-behaved kid so my parents brought in an exorcist once a month to give me a “tune up”. Not really, I kid, I kid!

But seriously, I couldn’t stand split pea soup, but I had never eaten a homemade version. It was always from a can. On a good day, it might be from the familiar red and white can, which was only slightly less disgusting. But most of the time it was the dreaded “store brand”, words that send shivers down my spine.

Split Pea Ingredients

Then one day recently, while watching one of the many cooking shows that I watch, or “my stories” as I refer to them, I saw a recipe for split pea soup, and thought “hmmmm, that looks pretty good”, (I think it was this recipe) so I decided to set aside my former opinion and give it a shot.

My opinion has completely changed. I am sure that if you were to set a bowl of that grayish mush from a can in front of me, I would still hate it, but now I know that, as with most things, there are good versions and bad versions. And I like to believe that this is a good version.

Remember that when cooking any grain or legume in the pressure cooker, never fill it over 1/2 full.

Veggies Chopped

Start by chopping up some onion, celery, carrots, garlic and ham. I only had two celery stalks in the ingredients picture, but I decided to add another at the last minute.

Heat up some oil and sauté the onion, celery carrot and ham for about five minutes or so, until the onion starts to become translucent.

Ham and Veggies

Add in the garlic and continue for another minute or so.

Now toss in the Herbes De Provence, cayenne and a little salt and pepper and cook for another 30 seconds or so.

Add the peas.

Peas Veggies Ham

Pour in the Worcestershire sauce, liquid smoke, chicken stock and water.

Toss the Bay Leaves in, cover the pressure cooker and turn the heat to high.

When high pressure is reached, lower the heat to maintain high pressure and set the timer for fifteen minutes.

Soup Finished

When time is up. let the pressure come down on its own.

When pressure is released, open pressure cooker very carefully.

Give it a stir to break up the peas.

Serve it with toppings of your choice. A little cubed ham, some Feta cheese. And I don’t know why, but for some reason I thought onion rings would go great with this. So the next day, I served the leftovers with onion rings on the side and topped each bowl with an onion ring. And it turned out my hunch was right, they went great together!

Split Pea Soup Bowl

As an added bonus, this is a perfect way to use up that leftover Easter ham!

Pressure Cooker Split Pea Soup
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Recipe type: Entree
Cuisine: American
Author:
Prep time:
Cook time:
Total time:
Serves: 5-6 servings
A great way to use that leftover Easter ham, this flavorful and filling soup is perfect for cooler weather.
Ingredients
  • 3 tablespoons cooking oil
  • 16 ounces split peas, rinsed
  • 1 pound ham, cut into cubes
  • 1 large onion, chopped
  • 3 stalks celery, sliced
  • 3 medium carrots, chopped
  • 4 cloves garlic, pressed
  • 2 teaspoons Herbes De Provence
  • ½ teaspoon cayenne pepper
  • salt and pepper
  • 1 tablespoon Worcestershire Sauce
  • 1 teaspoon liquid smoke
  • 1 quart chicken stock
  • 1 cup water
  • 2 bay leaves
Instructions
  1. Heat the oil in the pressure cooker over medium heat
  2. Sauté onions, carrots, celery and ham until onions start to become translucent, about five minutes
  3. Add garlic and continue to sauté for another minute
  4. Add Herbes De Provence, cayenne, ½ teaspoon salt and a few grinds of black pepper
  5. Sauté for another 30 seconds or so
  6. Add the peas
  7. Add in the Worcestershire Sauce, liquid smoke, chicken stock and water
  8. Toss in the bay leaves
  9. Cover pressure cooker, turn heat to high and bring to high pressure
  10. When high pressure is reached, lower heat to maintain high pressure and set timer for fifteen minutes
  11. When time is up, remove from heat and let pressure release naturally
  12. Remove lid carefully
  13. Stir to break up peas, soup should thicken
  14. Serve in bowls with toppings of your choice. I like it with a little Feta or Cotija cheese, or with an onion ring on top

 

Sneak Peek – Split Pea Soup

Sneak Peek, or not? How to use that leftover Easter ham.

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Ok, I’ve been wrestling with whether to post this recipe or not. I don’t know if its uniqueness is enough to warrant a post.

With the number of recipes for pressure cooker Split Pea soup around, I don’t know if there is enough to differentiate this one from the innumerable others.

I was wondering whether I should post this or not, but all I know is that as a kid, I hated split pea soup. Of course I had never even tasted split pea soup that didn’t come in a can that had to be mixed with a can or two of water. Nasty stuff.

So, I decided to try and make some “non-gross” split pea soup. I figured that since I like soups of red and yellow lentils, why wouldn’t I like soup made of split peas, since it is essentially the same thing. And my hunch was correct, this is delicious.

So, I am still trying to decide if I should post the recipe or not. At the moment I am thinking yes.

Check back on the weekend to see if I decide to post this, or if I come up with something new. Stay tuned!

Pressure Cooker Rogan Josh

This Rogan Josh Is tasty, and that’s no joshing! 

Rogan Josh5

Since Easter is right around the corner, I thought it was time to add another lamb recipe to my repertoire.

One of the more popular dishes in Kashmiri cuisine, Rogan Josh Wikipedia description here is one of those things that no matter how you do it, everyone is going to tell you that you are doing it wrong and that it is “not authentic”, but don’t let that deter you. I’m not claiming that this is authentic, just good.

Rogan Josh Ingredients

My version probably leans a little more towards the version you would get at a British Curry House, but since I have never been to a British Curry House, I cannot verify that either. Much like Chili and Gumbo, there is the Tomato/No Tomato debate here as well. And yes, I do use tomatoes. A lot of recipes use yogurt, but I use some coconut milk, mainly because it works so well in the pressure cooker. I do top it with a little yogurt, though. You can skip this if you would like a paleo version.

Lamb Cubed

I found some good lamb at my local butcher and they even offered to cut it up for me, so I couldn’t very well turn that down. Either leg or shoulder would work well for this. The shoulder was a few bucks per pound cheaper, so shoulder it is!

I know two onions looks like a lot, but they will totally break down and you will end up with a tasty, oniony sauce.

Onions Garlic

Just as a lot of recipes start out, this one starts with browning the meat. I just brown it on one side. That is enough to add the caramelized flavor without taking too much time.

After the meat is browned and set aside on a plate, toss the onions in the pot, adding a little more oil if the pot looks dry. Let them cook until they start to darken just a bit, about ten minutes. Toss the garlic and ginger paste (or freshly grated ginger) in and sauté another minute or so.

Now its time to add the paprika, cayenne, cardamom, cumin, coriander, Chinese 5 spice, garam masala, fennel and turmeric. Sauté for just about 30 seconds, stirring constantly so nothing burns.

Spices

Pour in the tomatoes, coconut milk and water.

Now, return the meat to the pan and stir everything together.

Onions and Spices

Toss in a couple bay leaves, put the top on the pot, bring to high pressure and set time for 15 minutes.

Let the pressure come down for about ten minutes, then do a quick release.

Rogan Josh Cooked

If it looks really liquid, turn heat to medium and let it boil for about ten minutes, stirring frequently, until it thickens a little.

Serve it on plates or bowls with rice and naan or pita bread.

Rogan Josh on Plate1

I like to top it with a little yogurt, but you can leave it off if you want a paleo version.

Enjoy!

Pressure Cooker Rogan Josh
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Author:
Prep time:
Cook time:
Total time:
Serves: 4-6 servings
Ingredients
  • 3 tablespoons olive or coconut oil
  • 2-1/2 pounds lamb, cut into 1-1/2" to 2" cubes
  • 2 onions finely chopped
  • 5 cloves garlic, crushed
  • 2 teaspoons ginger paste (or freshly grated ginger)
  • 2 tablespoon paprika
  • 2 teaspoons cumin
  • 1 teaspoons cayenne
  • 1 teaspoons Chinese 5 spice
  • 1 teaspoon garam masala
  • 1 teaspoon turmeric
  • ½ teaspoon cardamom
  • ½ teaspoon coriander
  • ½ teaspoon fennel
  • 1 can crushed tomatoes
  • 1 cup coconut milk
  • 1 cup water
  • 2 bay leaves
Instructions
  1. Heat oil over medium heat
  2. Working in batches, brown lamb on one side only and remove to plate
  3. Sauté onion until it starts to brown just a bit (about 10 minutes)
  4. Add the garlic and ginger and sauté another minute
  5. Pour in the paprika, cayenne, cardamom, cumin, coriander, Chinese 5 spice, garam masala, turmeric and fennel
  6. Saute for about 30 seconds
  7. Add the tomatoes, coconut milk and water
  8. Add the lamb back in and stir everything together
  9. Add the bay leaves
  10. Put the lid on the pressure cooker, turn heat to high (for electric pressure cooker, set to high pressure) and set timer for 15 minutes
  11. When timer goes off, remove from heat and do a quick release
  12. If it looks really liquid, put over medium-high heat (for electric, use sauté or brown function on medium) and let boil for about 10 minutes, stirring frequently to thicken.
  13. Serve with rice on plates or bowls.
  14. Top with yogurt (optional)

 

Pressure Cooker Lamb Recipes

Hippity Hoppity Easter’s On Its Way! Pressure Cooker Lamb Recipes!

I’ve noticed an increase in searches for Lamb recipes the closer it gets to Easter, so once again I’ve used the bad sitcom idea of the “clip show”, to bring you a “very special” Easter episode of Pressure Cooker Convert.

So here are links to a couple of pressure cooker lamb recipes perfect for your Easter meal. And if all goes well, I will have a brand new lamb recipe this weekend.

1. Pressure Cooker Leg Of Lamb

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A delicious leg of lamb with yogurt mint sauce. A tasty holiday dinner.

2. Three Season Lamb Stew

Three-Season-Lamb-Stew-Final-Small

A slightly lighter stew, great for the warmer spring weather.

And don’t forget to stop by this weekend for a brand new lamb recipe!

Pressure Cooker Black Bean Barley Salad

A Healthy, Warm Weather Meal

Black Bean Barley Salad Plated

Man, I really had to switch gears on this week’s recipe. My plans were to post a recipe for chowder, until the last several days saw the mercury climbing ever higher (yeah, I know that no thermometers use mercury any more, but I really like the sound of it). It was pushing 80 F by the time I unstuck myself from the sheets this morning (no air conditioning in the apartment). Even in the morning, while it was slightly cooler, I could not imagine myself eating chowder later in the day.

So, I decided that I must figure out how to use the pressure cooker to make a salad. After many hours of head-scratching and brow-furrowing I decided to make a salad with grains and beans, which of course, can be made in the pressure cooker.

Black Bean Barley Salad Ingredients

Cooking the barley and beans together, I was able to cut down on the time spent using appliances. And, using the Instant Pot it does not increase the temperature in the kitchen by any detectable amount.

Even so, it is probably a good idea to get the cooking part out of the way early while it is still relatively cool, then let it cool for awhile before you add in the other ingredients.

First, let’s just worry about getting the beans and barley ready. Yes, I know these days that there doesn’t seem to be any other grain besides quinoa, but I decided on barley. Beer is made from barley, and I like beer, so obviously barley is better than quinoa.

Barley Rinsing

I wasn’t able to try this a couple times before posting it, but fortunately it turned out pretty well.

Put 4 cups of water, 1 cup of beans and 1 cup of pearl barley in the pressure cooker along with 1/2 teaspoon of cumin and a bay leaf. For most dishes I would soak the beans overnight, but for this, I recommend just rinsing. For this, we want the beans to remain firm, not to break down like you would want for soup.

Chopped Veggies

Bring to high pressure and cook for 20 minutes.

When time is up, remove from heat, wait 10 minutes then do a quick release.

Let it cool while you go somewhere air-conditioned to have breakfast (at least, that’s what I did).

When you get back, chop and slice and whatnot the various vegetables, cheese and meat. Mix it in with the beans and barley.

Cheese Cubes

Now, let’s get to the dressing. In a blender or food processor, mix together the juice of 2 limes, 1/4 cup apple cider vinegar, 2 tablespoons honey (if making a vegan version, you can sub agave nectar), 2 tablespoons of chopped cilantro, 1/2 teaspoon salt and some black pepper. Go ahead and blenderize (yes, blenderize!) that mixture and when it is smooth pour over the salad and mix together.

It is best to let the flavors blend, so pop it in the fridge and go to the local pub for a brewski while the flavors meld.

Black Bean Barley Salad Plated2

When you get home, remove the whole deal from the fridge, mix it up again, and serve it up.

Enjoy, and make sure you have some ice cream on hand for dessert!

 

Pressure Cooker Black Bean Barley Salad
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Recipe type: Entree
Cuisine: Latin
Author:
Prep time:
Cook time:
Total time:
Serves: 6 servings
Ingredients
For Salad
  • I cup Black Beans, rinsed
  • 1 cup Pearl Barley, rinsed
  • ½ teaspoon cumin
  • 1 Bay Leaf
  • 4 cups water
  • 1 Red Bell Pepper, chopped
  • ½ Red Onion, thinly sliced
  • 6 Radishes, thinly sliced
  • 4 ounces sliced Spanish Chorizo or Salami, slices cut into quarters (omit for vegan or vegetarian option)
  • 6 ounces smoked gouda, cubed (omit for vegan option)
For Dressing
  • ½ cup Extra Virgin olive oil
  • Juice of 2 limes
  • ¼ cup apple cider vinegar
  • 2 tablespoons honey
  • 2 Tablespoons chopped cilantro
  • ½ Teaspoon Salt
  • Black Pepper to taste
Instructions
For Salad
  1. Put beans and barley in pressure cooker pot
  2. Add 4 cups water, ½ teaspoon cumin and bay leaf
  3. Put top on pressure cooker and set for high pressure
  4. When high pressure is reached, set timer for 20 minutes
  5. When time is up, remove pressure cooker from heat
  6. Let pressure release naturally for 10 minutes, then do a quick release
  7. With slotted spoon or spider, remove beans and barley to bowl and let cool
  8. When mixture has cooled, add bell pepper, onion, radishes, cilantro, chorizo and cheese
  9. Mix everything together
For Dressing
  1. In blender or food processor, mix the olive oil, lime juice, vinegar, honey (substitute agave nectar if making a vegan version), cilantro, salt and pepper
  2. Blend until smooth
  3. Pour over salad, then mix everything together
  4. Refrigerate for an hour or so to let flavors meld